Sud 777: Meanwhile in married life

What do you do when you’ve got a Sunday in Mexico City? You could hit up a local market, which we do, and consume our body weight in tacos, for breakfast. Blame it on the jet lag. Then, you could settle into leafy Polanco’s Pujol for lunch, sitting snugly (at #20) in the world’s top restaurants. It’s closed on Sundays! So, always armed with a plan b, we’re headed for the hills to my next conquest, Sud 777.

We arrive with a bit of wriggle room ahead of our 3pm table, and cocktails in a light-filled courtyard bar seem like a genius idea. Hello, urban oasis. The fit-out is contemporary triple height ceilings coupled with varying levels of cosy cubbyholes where you could easily while away a few hours in the most delicious company. So far so good in terms of lunch goals.

On paper, Chef-patron Edgar Nuñoz’s menu promises contemporary Mexican fare, and with stints at El Bulli and Noma behind him, I have every confidence in what’s to come. It does read unnecessarily clumsy at times, enter ‘inverted tostadas’. Fortunately, we don’t let this influence our choices, and yes said tostada might be somewhat deconstructed, but it is still a playground of tuna and avocado gorgeousness. Continuing the raw theme, tiritados and ceviches delight, adorned with fitting cucumber scrolls and tomato pearls respectively.

The succession of mains which follow raise the game. Achiote-marinated octopus is grilled to the point of charred perfection before becoming burned. A wild card dish of sweetbreads sit in a glistening meaty jus lifted by lemon and a Goldilocks’ just-right smack of Serrano chili on top. My gold star is easily awarded to the suckling pig; we’re talking the biggest hunk of crackling you’ve ever seen and oh-so-succulent pork, all of which comes with a rich black bean stew.

There is a depth flavour across the board at Sud 777, partly related to the indigenous spices brought into play and mainly due to the Nuñoz effect. Achiote for example are pellet-sized red seeds used to enhance a dishes' colour and then we have THAT black bean stew; Nuñoz’s rift on a Yucatan ‘frijol con puerco’, traditionally served with pork. My tips on reading between the lines on the longwinded menu? Dive into the raw fish options and share as many of the meat dishes you can muster.

So what does one do when lunch at Sud777 sadly draws to a close? Cruise into the Roma barrio for a final Mezcal-laced fix of the day at Licoria Limantour, of course.
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Five Very Kerri things about Sud 777

  1. All the spices
  2. Surprising sweetbreads
  3. Crackling to jump into bed with
  4. Hiding places and alcove galore
  5. My first sip of 400 Conejos Mezcal